Baked Alaska

Happy birthday to you,

Happy birthday to you,

Happy birthday That Cooking Thing,

Happy birthday to you!

Hey guys, That Cooking Thing turned two years old yesterday and this post marks the third year for recipes from this blog. I just want to extend a massive ‘thank you’ to those who have been following me since the beginning, a few of you have liked every single post and I feel so honoured that you guys are still here after all this time. To those of you who have joined more recently, welcome and I hope you stay around for a long time to come!

I thought it would be appropriate to make something super celebratory to mark this bloggiversary so this week I have made a Baked Alaska. No corners have been cut in this recipe (although I wouldn’t judge if you bought the ice cream because making it fresh takes time). This baked Alaska is vanilla flavoured with a little bit of chocolate. A layer of vanilla sponge with a dome of creamy, delicious vanilla ice cream with a centre of chocolate chip ice cream all topped with peaks of French meringue and then baked in the oven. The homemade ice cream is certainly the star of this dessert and you do not want to detract from it by jazzing everything else up too much. You can tailor your flavours though, why not coffee ice cream and a brownie base? Or strawberry ice cream and chocolate cake?

When it comes to baking your Alaska, you have three options: the oven, the blowtorch or fire. Traditionally (and as I have done in this recipe) the entire dessert is placed into a maximum setting oven for five minutes to caramelize the outside and give the beautiful golden crust you associate with a baked Alaska. The blowtorch method is most likely the best thing to use if you are piping on your meringue as the blowtorch will crisp any edges (such as those left by a star tipped piping bag) and really bring out the definition of the meringue. If you use a blowtorch, I would recommend using a Swiss or Italian meringue where the egg whites have already been heated during the cooking process. For a classic baking in the oven, you could still use these meringues if you want but there is no need to expend the extra effort as a French meringue will work just fine! The final method – the flambé – is obviously the most theatrical but is the hardest to control. Once you have set the alcohol on fire and poured it over the Alaska, you cant stop the cooking if it goes too far. It might even be worth a practice run on a separate Alaska (just for you of course) to work out the correct quantity of rum to use for the flambé.

 

If you try this for yourself, let me know how it goes – maybe even give me a tag on Instagram so I can see what you have made. Have a fab one and hopefully the next two years will be as successful as the last two.

 

 

Baked Alaska

Work time: 1 hour

Cooling time: overnight

 

Ingredients:

1 tub vanilla ice cream

OR

4 egg yolks

300ml double cream

300ml whole milk

1 vanilla pod

100g caster sugar

 

For the cake:

2 oz. butter

2 oz. caster sugar

2 oz. self-raising flour

1 egg

½ tsp Vanilla extract

½ tsp milk

 

For the meringue:

4 egg whites

8 oz. caster sugar

¼ tsp cream of tartar or ¼ tsp white wine vinegar

 

 

For non-homemade ice cream:

Allow the ice cream to soften a little until it can be scooped easily.

Line a 600ml bowl with a double layer of cling film.

Scoop the ice cream into the bowl, press it down and wrap the clingfilm over the top.

Place back into the freezer until completely solid (probably best to do this overnight).

 

For homemade ice cream:

Follow churning instructions on your ice cream maker – mine requires the bowl to be cooled for 24 hours in the freezer prior to use but other varieties may differ.

Pour the cream and the milk into a heavy based saucepan.

Split the vanilla pod down the middle and scrape out the seeds. Add both the seeds and the pod into the milk mixture.

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Gently warm the milk until it is hot to the touch but not boiling. You do not want to scald the milk.

While the milk is heating, lightly beat the egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl until they have lightened in colour and you have a homogenous mixture.

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Once the milk mix has begun to steam, take one cup of it and slowly pour into the egg mixture whilst whisking. This will temper the eggs.

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Stream the rest of the milk into the egg mix whilst stirring continuously.

Return the mixture to the pan and gently heat, constantly stirring in a figure of eight, until the custard begins to thicken. The custard will coat the back of a metal spoon when it is ready. The mixture will start to steam quite a lot before it begins to thicken so don’t worry if you start to see wisps rising from the surface. Once the custard begins to thicken, it will do so very fast and you will be able to see that it is far more viscous.

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Pour the custard through a fine sieve and into a jug. Leave this to cool completely before the next step.

 

If using an ice cream maker, follow the instructions on your machine. Some will have an internal freezer, others will require freezing prior to use. The following instructions are for my brand of ice cream maker: the Magimix 1.1.

Assembler the ice cream maker and turn on the paddle.

Stream the custard into the maker and then leave for 25 minutes to half an hour until the ice cream is very thick and frozen. If you are unsure, and your ice cream maker is still churning away happily, give it another five minutes as this can’t do any damage!

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Before you turn off the ice cream machine, double line a 600ml bowl with cling film.

Scoop the ice cream into the bowl, cover the top and leave to freeze solid overnight.

 

 

For the cake:

Preheat the oven to gas mark 3.

Grease and line an eight inch tin.

In a bowl, beat the butter until light and fluffy.

Add the sugar and vanilla and beat again.

Add the egg and beat to combine.

Finally, add the flour and slowly mix until just combined.

Add the milk and mix one last time.

Pour the cake batter into the baking tin and spread it out.

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Bake for 25-30 minutes until golden brown.

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Leave to cool.

 

 

To prepare the Alaska for serving:

Preheat the oven to gas mark 9.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks.

Add the cream of tartar and whisk again.

Slowly sprinkle in the caster sugar a spoon at a time until it has all been incorporated.

Continue to beat until you have a glossy meringue. The sugar should be completely dissolved.

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Assembly:

Remove the ice cream from the freezer.

Cut the cake to the same size as the base of the ice cream dome.

Place the ice cream on top of the cake on a baking sheet.

Spread the meringue all over the ice cream and the cake. Make sure the meringue covers everything.

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Use the back of a spoon to make peaks in the meringue.

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Bake for five minutes turning halfway through to ensure it is crisped up evenly around the outside.

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Transfer the Alaska onto a plate and serve.

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I hope you enjoyed the recipe. This was one of more complicated things I have made for the blog but only because I made the ice cream from scratch. The final result is absolutely delicious and it is sure to wow anyone you make it for. You could always make mini ones too if you want to do single portions.

 

If you would like to know a little bit more about the different types of meringue, check out my usual recipes for both swiss and French meringues. If you are just interested in the cake element, why not make yourself a Victoria sandwich?

 

Have a good one and I will see you next week with a delicious savoury snack.

H

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