Buckwheat Pancakes

Although they have similar names, buckwheat and (regular) wheat are not related – in fact it is closer to rhubarb and sorrel than it is to standard wheat. It has been called a superfood owing to its incredibly high concentration of protein, fibre and selected vitamins and minerals. (Make of that what you will, I’m not particularly taken by so called superfoods, but you cannot argue that buckwheat is healthy.) It is also perfect if you are celiac or gluten free as buckwheat contains no gluten!

Buckwheat is eaten all around the world owing to its ability to thrive in “low fertility” soils. It is perfectly happy to grow in acidic conditions if the soil is properly drained. The plants left after the seeds have been harvested can be dug back into the ground and used as green manure. Its high nutrition levels make it particularly popular when there is little else to eat as it can help reduce malnutrition.

Recently the use of buckwheat in foods has dramatically increased in an explosion of gluten free baking however in Japan and India, unlike in western countries, buckwheat has been eaten for centuries and holds deep cultural significance. Soba noodles, from Japan, are made from buckwheat flour and the lack of gluten meant that an entirely new production system to stretch out the noodles had to be invented. In India, some Hindus will eat buckwheat-based foods on days where they fast as they will only abstain from cereals and buckwheat does not fall under that category so need not be avoided.

The pancakes in this recipe use a mixture of buckwheat flour and wholemeal (or brown) flour. They look healthier than standard crepes… Wholemeal flour comes from regular wheat but unlike the standard white flour we use, it is not bleached (leading to its darker colour). Another difference between the whole wheat and standard white flour is the flavour. There is a distinctive taste with brown flour that you do not get with white.

These pancakes are most definitely savoury. They are delicious for dinner when filled with mushrooms or creamed leeks. You could even treat yourself and have them with smoked salmon and cream cheese! I hope you enjoy them because they are super simple and make a great last-minute dinner when there is nothing else in the house.

 

 

Buckwheat pancakes

2 oz. (50g) buckwheat flour

2 oz. (50g) wholemeal flour

Pinch of salt

1 egg

Half pint milk

Oil for frying

 

In a bowl, stir together the flours and salt.

51753171_257863761804250_2129683332135387136_n

Make a well in the centre and add the egg and half the milk.

Whisk to a smooth, relatively thick paste.

Slowly whisk in the rest of milk to create the pancake batter (for thicker pancakes, only add half of the remaining milk)

52014010_315371075992562_4088911648654360576_n

Heat a frying pan and add a little oil. If you aren’t using a non-stick pan, don’t go to the next step until the oil starts to shimmer otherwise the pancakes will stick.

Pour 60ml (a quarter cup) of batter into the centre of the pan and tilt the pan to spread it out.

Once the top stops being shiny, flip the pancake. It should be golden brown underneath.

52057054_1229802603837457_84838759580827648_n

Add fillings of your choice to the pancake while the underneath is cooking and then fold it in half.

51588401_767312383669618_4387526482633687040_n

You can keep these warm in the oven on a low setting while you cook the rest or serve them straight out of the pan.

51737736_385488902016062_8973409952454410240_n

51638536_455803968289897_2441878835524796416_n

I hope you enjoyed the recipe. For other simple recipes, check out my parsnip and my sweet potato soups.

Have a good one and I will be back next week with a recipe for a deliciously light cake.

H

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you enjoyed the recipe

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s