Salmon Curry

Curry powder is a wonderful thing. It makes life a lot easier when you can buy a premixed spice blend to make dinner with but sometimes it just isn’t quite the right ratios for what you are looking for and you have to make it yourself.

Unlike most curry powders, the spice mix I’ve used in this recipe doesn’t contain either pepper or ginger but instead replaces them with tamarind paste giving a slight tang to the curry which goes perfectly with mango chutney. Tamarind paste is one of my favourite ingredients in cooking. It gives sourness to dishes which provides a depth of flavour otherwise lost if you replace the tamarind with lemon or lime juice.

Tamarind grows in pods with a fleshy interior and large flat seeds. The young fruit are very sour and are used in savoury dishes and as a pickling agent owing to the high concentration of tartaric acid in the flesh. As the fruits age and ripen, they become significantly sweeter and start to be used in jam and desserts instead. One of the most eaten dishes which uses tamarind as a primary flavouring is Pad Thai. The sauce uses both tamarind and sugar along with several other seasonings and this mixture of sour and sweet is almost impossible to stop eating.

The recipe below doesn’t use tamarind as a primary ingredient but the addition of it gives the curry sauce a hot and sour flavour which pairs beautifully with a slightly sweeter accompaniment like dahl. The coconut milk gives a creamy, velvety mouth feel to the sauce helping offset the aggressive flavours in the curry without taking away from the taste. Of course depending on how spicy you like your curry, you can add more dried chilli or even fresh chillies during cooking to take your meal from a gentle warming feeling to melt your face off hot. One of the best things about this dish is how quick it is to prepare. The whole thing can be done in about ten minutes. I use a rice cooker at home and I tend to let it finish cooking the rice before I start cooking the salmon for this. The speed of this dish makes it perfect for a weeknight dinner especially if you are getting home late and don’t want to spend ages slaving away over a hot hob.

As always with this kind of meal, you can exchange the salmon for chicken or another choice of meat or fish or even make a tofu or vegetable curry. Just make sure to cook everything first before you add the curry sauce as the sauce cooks very quickly. If you want to cut time even further, you can make up a large batch of curry powder by premixing the spices and just taking a tablespoon as and when you want to make this dish.

 

Salmon Curry

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Serves: 2

Cost per serving: around £2

 

 

½ tsp turmeric

½ tsp chilli powder (or more if you like it spicy)

1 tsp tamarind paste

1 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp ground coriander

3 large cloves of garlic – minced

½ tsp salt

200ml coconut milk

2 salmon fillets with the skin removed cut in half width-wise

2 tbsp vegetable oil

 

Mix the turmeric, chilli powder, cumin, coriander, garlic, salt and tamarind in a bowl with 160ml water (2/3 cup).

Heat the vegetable oil in a large non-stick frying pan until it starts to glisten.

Place the salmon fillets into the pan careful not to get splashed by hot oil. Place the fillets with the side that the skin was on upwards.

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Sear the salmon for around four minutes until the underside starts to go golden.

Flip the pieces of salmon and pour in the spice mix. This will bubble a lot so be prepared for a large quantity of steam.

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Let the mixture bubble for about two minutes to cook the spices and then add the coconut milk into the pan and stir this through.

Allow the salmon to cook for another few minutes until it is your desired doneness. This takes around three minutes for softer, flakier fish or five minutes for fish that is a little drier.

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Serve with rice and your choice of sides. I like to have this with dahl and mango chutney.

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I hope you enjoyed the recipe. Salmon is my favourite fish and the more ways I learn how to cook it, the more often I can eat it without getting bored. If you aren’t a fan of curry, my pan seared salmon with lemon cous-cous is also a super quick dish and is probably slightly healthier than this one as it doesn’t have coconut milk in it. It you are looking for something a little bit more on the sweet side, check out how to make yourself a peach galette. It’s a sweet pastry covered which doesn’t require any tins – all you need is a baking tray!

Have a good one and I will be back next week with a recipe filled with chocolatey goodness.

H

Hot Water Crust Chicken Pie

Golden brown; solid; filled with a tasty meat interior; the hot water crust pie is a British classic. Traditionally stuffed with layers of minced meat surrounded by jelly, hot water crust pies are filling, delicious and, above all else, really simple to make.

Hot water crust is a fantastic gateway into baking pastry as you do not need to worry about overworking the dough. Unlike with shortcrust, where too much handling can lead to a rock-hard result, hot water crust pastry requires kneading to build up the gluten and strengthen the final pie. The hot water partially cooks the flour giving the dough a more rubbery and pliable texture.

The most well-known use for hot water crust pastry is the pork pie. These are normally hand raised – baked without a tin – and packed full of minced pork and seasonings. Hand raising the pies gives an irregular finish and the sides buckle during cooking. The resulting pie has bowed edges and a unique shape. The recipe I am using today is quite different. Whilst it also makes use of the hot water crust’s ability to hold heavy fillings, it is both baked in a tin and not primarily meat based. In fact, the filling is made up of lots of vegetables with a little chicken and instead of pouring gelatine enriched stock into the finished pie, the filling is bound together with a gravy thickened with cornflour.

I like to take slices of this pie for lunch as it is strong enough to not break whilst it is carried around and it also tastes great cold as well as hot. I hope you enjoy the pie and this introduction to hot water crust inspires you to try other meat pies.

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Hot Water Crust Chicken Pie

 

Cook time: 20 minutes for filling, 1 hour for baking

Prep time: 30 minutes

Serves 8

Cost per portion: around 90p (for the pure chicken pie)

 

For the pastry:

250g butter (or lard if you prefer)

275ml water

600g plain flour

120g strong white flour (bread flour)

1 tsp salt

Optional:

Black pepper

½ tsp cayenne pepper

¼ bunch parsley finely chopped

1 egg

1 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp onion powder

 

For the filling:

2 chicken breasts – thinly sliced

500g onion – finely diced

4 large cloves garlic – minced

2 large carrots – cut into ½ cm thick semicircles

300ml chicken stock

¼ cup cornflour mixed with ¼ cup water

Salt and pepper to taste

2 tbsp oil

Optional:

½ tsp smoked paprika

½ tsp cayenne pepper

¼ bunch of parsley finely chopped

125g choritzo/150g bacon

 

To make the filling, heat the oil in a large pan and add the onion.

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Fry until the onion turns translucent and then add both the garlic and the carrots.

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Continue to fry for another five minutes and then push the vegetables to the edge of the pan to create a well in the middle.

Add the chicken into the well and fry, stirring regularly until the outside is white and the chicken is sealed.

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Pour in the stock and stir it through.

Once the stock is boiling, cook for two minutes and then quickly stir through the cornflour mixture. This will immediately turn very viscous as the cornflour cook but the mix will slacken as you mix in the stock in the pan.

Stir in the parsley, remove from the heat and leave the filling to cool.

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Once the filling has mostly cooled (it can still be a little warm), it is time to start the pastry.

Preheat the oven to gas mark 6 (200°C). You can keep the pie uncooked for a few hours if you wish to make it ahead of time.

If you wish to add bacon or choritzo to the pie, chop the choritzo into half centimetre thick half moons or slice the bacon to the desired size.

Place one tablespoon of unflavoured oil into a heavy based saucepan and add the meat.

Fry the meat until most of the fat has rendered out and the choritzo/bacon is starting to go crispy.

Remove the meat from the pan (reserving the fat) and stir it into the filling.

Measure how much fat you have got left.

To make the pastry, place the butter and water into a heavy based pan and heat until the water is boiling. If you have used choritzo or bacon, take the volume of fat in ml away from the weight of the butter in grams and use the fat instead of some of the butter. This will help flavour the pastry.

Stir together the dry ingredients in a large bowl, make a well in the centre and pour in the boiling water.

Using a spoon, mix the dough as much as you can and when it becomes too stiff to mix with a spoon, pour it out onto a surface and kneed the dough together. Don’t worry about overworking it, just be careful not to burn yourself if the pastry is still very hot. A good way to work the dough is to roll it out to about one centimetre thick, fold it into three and repeat this three or four times.

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It may look like there is not enough liquid for all of the flour but there will be!
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After a little kneading, the dough will all come together into one homogeneous ball.

Once the dough has come together, place it to one side and lightly grease a 10” springform tin.

Place a third of dough to one side and roll out the rest to about three quarters of a centimetre thickness. Use this to line the tin ensuring some of the dough is hanging over every edge. If you need to squish down some folds to get a flat outer edge, that is absolutely fine!

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No one is going to see the inside so it doesn’t have to be neat. Just make sure to leave enough pastry around the edges to seal the lid with.

Put the filling in the pie and spread it into all the corners. Be careful not to push it through the pastry walls.

Roll out the remaining dough and top the pie with it making sure to seal the edges to the pastry on the sides. Using fingers can give a lovely crimping effect.

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Beat the egg and brush a thin layer over the top of the pie. Use any off-cuts to decorate the top and egg wash those too before you bake the pie.

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Bake the pie for an hour or until the top is golden brown and the base is cooked through.

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Serve with fresh vegetables. You don’t really need potatoes as there should be a decent portion of pie crust in every slice.

 

This pie keeps really well and can be eaten both hot and cold. It also freezes very well which is perfect if you are cooking it for yourself as it makes a lot of portions.

I hope you enjoyed the recipe. If you fancy a slightly lighter dinner, try treating yourself to some smoked salmon risotto or if you are looking to try out a dessert instead, chequerboard biscuits are an impressive (but surprisingly easy) snack to try.

Have a good one and I will be back next week with a recipe for a fruity dessert.

H

Smoked Salmon Risotto

Smoked salmon is definitely a delicacy. It’s relatively expensive which isn’t ideal because I can easily sit down and eat an entire packet in one go. The trick with smoked salmon is making it go further and putting it into a risotto is a fantastic way to flavour a large amount of food without needing too much of the fish itself.

Smoking food became popular as a good way of preserving it. Upping the salt content and decreasing the moisture makes it very hard for bacteria to grow in the food helping it keep longer before spoiling. The process of smoking food has probably been around since humans evolved. Food would be stored off the ground to keep it away from pests but the lack of ventilation in the dwellings led to the build up of smoke at the top of the houses – where the food was stored – and thus the food was smoked. Once people realised that smoked foods lasted far longer than those which were unsmoked, smoking became a widely used preservation method. As it was functional rather than for flavour, large amounts of salt were used to draw out the moisture and the smoking time was often days long. As infrastructure improved, food could be stored in fridges and cold houses. As a result, the quantity of smoke and salt used to preserve foods declined leading to what we have today.

There are several different methods of smoking; the most common types being hot and cold smoking. The process of cold smoking does not cook the meat and because of that, brining and curing must be done before the food is smoked. This is what gives us the classic smoked salmon that you see in a supermarket, thinly sliced and still a bright pink colour. In contrast to this, hot smoking cooks the fish. This means that the food is safe to eat without further cooking as may sometimes be necessary with cold smoking.

The first time I tried this recipe, I was having dinner at a friend’s house and we ended up cooking together. I must admit I was a bit dubious as the idea of placing smoked salmon into a hot saucepan of rice worried me greatly; surely the salmon would just go hard and leathery and lose its flavour? That is the beauty of this recipe. If done right, the latent heat in the risotto should cook the chopped salmon just enough to change its colour whilst still allowing it to remain soft. The remaining salmon is served on top of the risotto keeping it from the heat and therefore preventing it cooking.

This dish really is a treat so I hope you enjoy it.

 

Smoked Salmon Risotto

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Serves 2

Cost per portion: around £2.40

 

1 small onion finely diced

1 clove of garlic minced

175g risotto rice (I like to use Arborio risotto rice)

750ml vegetable stock

Zest of one lemon

Juice of half a lemon

1 tbsp chopped parsley

60g mascarpone

100g smoked salmon

1 tbsp oil

 

Sautee the onion in the oil for five minutes until it starts to soften and goes translucent.

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Add the garlic and rice and fry for another minute.

Pour in half of the stock and stir everything together. Wait for the rice to absorb the stock stirring regularly.

Once the stock is all absorbed, add half of the remaining liquid and stir it through.

Repeat with the remaining stock.

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After the first addition of stock vs. after the risotto is cooked.

If the rice isn’t fully cooked at this point, add another tablespoon of water and continue to cook over a medium heat stirring regularly to ensure that all the rice is cooked evenly.

Once the rice is almost cooked through, add the mascarpone, lemon juice, zest and the parsley and stir through. Cook for another minute.

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Remove the risotto from the heat and cover.

Chop about three quarters of the smoked salmon into small pieces.

Stir these through the risotto, the remaining heat should cook the salmon but not make it leathery.

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Serve the risotto immediately and top with the remaining salmon.

If you so wish, garnish the risotto with parsley and lemon zest.

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I hope you enjoyed this recipe. It’s a luxurious meal yet still quite light and doesn’t leave you feeling bloated. If you fancy a bit of a more fiery dinner, check out how to make my spicy enchiladas or if you are looking for something a little sweeter, why not make a carrot cake? It’s big, moist and packed full of flavour.

Have a good one and I will be back next week with a slightly more basic recipe for some delicious biscuits!

H

Enchiladas

The etymology of food names is a vast and fascinating subject. Some foods are named after the person who invented them, others after an area and some have their names directly lifted from the language of their country of origin.

One example of this is the enchilada. With a name deriving from the Spanish word ‘enchilar’ meaning ‘to season with chilli’ the name of the dish is a direct description of how it is made. In a similar vein, empanadas (a type of pasty) have a name derived from ‘empanar’ meaning ‘to coat in bread’.

Enchiladas were originally eaten as a street food and were unfilled tortillas dipped in a chilli sauce. Since then, they have evolved and been combined with other stuffed foods to created the dish that is known today. There are no strict rules as to what you can fill an enchilada with as long as it is spicy and, as a result, there are many different versions. Enchiladas suizas are topped with creamy sauces like béchamel and were created by Swiss migrants to Mexico who set up dairies to produce milk and cream. Enchiladas Verdes are topped with salsa verde instead of chilli sauce and are filled with poached chicken. Enmoladas are served with mole (a dark spicy sauce) instead of chilli and Enfrijoladas are topped with re-fried beans (the name deriving from the Spanish word for bean ‘frijol’).

The recipes I give below are very simple to make and are easily adaptable. I have found that using large tortillas means one enchilada can be served per person – especially if you serve them with sour cream and other toppings. I am very partial to coriander however, for those of you who do not like it, removing this does not detract from the recipe at all. Both fillings make a decent number of enchiladas and obviously, you can bulk them out more by adding more vegetables to make the meat go further. If you don’t eat meat, it can be excluded from the recipe or replaced by a meat substitute such as tofu or Quorn.

As anyone following this blog for some time may have realised, I love bulk cooking and the fillings for this can be frozen which is ideal because you can get several meals out of these recipes. You can also use them as standard fajita fillings too if you don’t want to go through the hassle of adding extra sauce and baking.

I hope you enjoy the recipe!

 

Enchiladas

Makes: 6-9 enchiladas

Prep time: 30 mins

Rest time: 10 mins

Cook time: 20 mins

 

 

Chicken Filling

2 large onions – finely sliced

2 large cloves of garlic – minced

1 large bell pepper – thinly sliced

2 chicken breasts – cubed

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1 packet fajita seasoning

½ tsp chilli flakes

2 tbsp oil

 

Beef Filling

2 large onions – finely diced

2 large cloves of garlic – minced

1 packet of beef mince

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1 packet fajita seasoning

½ tsp chilli flakes

2 tbsp oil

 

Extras

Large tortilla wraps

1 can re-fried beans

200g grated cheese (100g for filling and 100g for topping)

2 tbsp chopped coriander

 

1 jar enchilada sauce

OR

4 tbsp tomato paste

4 tbsp water

½ tsp garlic powder

½ tsp onion powder

1 tsp vegetable oil

Salt and pepper

Pinch of sugar

1 tsp dried chilli flakes

 

For the filling:

Place the oil, onions and garlic into a large pan over a medium heat and fry until the onion starts going soft.

Make a well in the centre and add the meat and fry until the meat is cooked on the outside (about three minutes)

Add the peppers if you are using them.

Sprinkle on the chilli flakes and the fajita seasoning (I love the BBQ one but there are loads of different flavours you can choose). If you like your food on the spicier side, you can always add more chilli and visa versa for a more mild flavour.

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Beef filling for enchiladas

Add the tomato paste and stir through. If the paste won’t spread out, add a tablespoon of water to help thin it down a little.

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Chicken filling for enchiladas (without peppers)

Remove from the heat and leave the filling to cool a little before using (it doesn’t have to be stone cold, just make sure it won’t burn your fingers)

 

Preheat the oven to gas mark 6 (2000C).

If you are making your own enchilada sauce, whisk all the ingredients together in a bowl and add salt and pepper to taste.

Take a large baking dish and spread a little of the enchilada sauce over the bottom.

Place a wrap on a flat surface and spread a line of re-fried beans about a quarter of the way up.

Add a line of meat filling on top of this and sprinkle a little grated cheese over it all.

Roll up the tortilla making sure to fold in the ends to stop the filling from escaping. Seal the end with a little water and place seam side down in the baking dish.

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Repeat with the rest of the tortillas.

Pour the remaining sauce over the top and sprinkle the rest of the grated cheese over the enchiladas.

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Sprinkle the coriander over the top and bake for fifteen to twenty minutes until the cheese on top is bubbly and starting to crisp up.

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Serve with a selection of sour cream, lime wedges, jalapenos, chopped coriander, guacamole or salsa.

These also keep very well if covered in the fridge.

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Chicken enchiladas with sour cream, coriander, lime wedges and jalapenos.
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Beef enchiladas with re-fried beans, coriander, sour cream and lime. 

I hope you enjoyed the recipe. If you fancy something a little sweeter, check out how to make my delicious apple crumble or for a lighter meal, why not make yourself a vibrant bowl of pea soup.

Have a good one and I will be back next week with an amazing recipe for carrot cake. For all of you guys who have had issues making cream cheese icing in the UK because it always turns to soup, this is one not to be missed!

H

 

Pea Soup

Pea soup is fantastic. Its fresh taste and bright colour make for an amazingly summery dish which is light and silky to eat. The additional effort required to strain the soup is most definitely worth it as it results in a smooth, velvety mouth feel; garnishing with a little herb oil (mint, thyme or garlic work best) gives a delicious, restaurant standard dish for very little extra effort.

Peas have been cultivated for almost 7000 years with records of them reaching back to the 5th millennium BCE in Egypt where they grew in the river delta of the Nile. Over the next few thousands of years, peas slowly migrated all over Asia. By the Middle Ages, the pea had made its way to Europe and nowadays they are everywhere.

The legume family, of which peas are a part, has formed a huge part of the human diet for millennia. From soya and broad beans to liquorice and peanuts, legumes permeate our lives and not just in their edible forms. Pernambuco, more commonly known as brazilwood outside of the classical music world, belongs to the same family as the common pea but is one of the most valuable woods on the planet with top end violin bows (which weigh less than 100g) costing thousands if not tens of thousands of pounds. Pernambuco was so in demand that there are currently severe restrictions on the cutting down and exportation of the wood to let the population replenish after years of over-harvesting.

Retuning from that tangent, there are several different species in the fabaceae family which are eaten; one of the most interesting to me is the butterfly pea. This strain is more known for its flowers than the peas it produces as the flowers are a vibrant shade of blue. They are used in teas along with other foods but the most fascinating thing is that the blue dye contained in them is an indicator. When in the presence of an acid (such as lemon juice) the dye turns from a deep blue to a bright pink. As a result of this, the butterfly pea flower has become incredibly popular in molecular gastronomy and in gimmicky drinks such as blue gin which turns a lurid shade of pink when the tonic is added.

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Butterfly pea flower tea with with lemon (left) and without lemon (right).

The soup recipe below gives a way for the flavour of the pea to shine through. It is very easy to overpower it with stock (a mistake you will make only once) but it is simple to prepare and will wow you and any guests you serve it to. Like any vegetable soup I make, I love to serve it with something bready for dipping. This time, I tried making green onion flatbreads which were delicious but it would probably have been easier to buy some nice sourdough from the local market. I also like to garnish my soups with a little flavoured oil and this time, I infused a little bit of olive oil with garlic and thyme by warming it gently and then letting the oil cool before straining out the solids. The thyme really does lift the soup to the next level!

I hope you like the recipe!

 

 

 

Pea Soup

Serves 4 or 5

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Cost per portion: around 25p

 

1 tbsp olive oil

1 large onion

2 large garlic cloves

1 litre weak vegetable stock (make it up to half strength as you don’t want to overpower the taste of the peas)

500g peas (fresh or frozen)

Pinch of sugar

1 teaspoon of chopped fresh thyme (optional)

Salt and pepper

 

Thinly slice the onion and place into a large pan with the oil.

Add the garlic and sauté for five to eight minutes until the onion goes soft.

Add the stock and bring to the boil.

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Once the stock is boiling, pour in the peas and cook for two/three minutes – check the peas to see if they are cooked through.

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When the peas are cooked, liquidise in a jug blender or using an immersion (stick) blender.

Strain through a fine metal sieve a cup at a time. Use a spoon to push the blended soup through the sieve and you will be left with a thick mush comprised of the pea skins which can be discarded.

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Season with salt and pepper and serve piping hot with bread for dipping.

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I hope you enjoyed the recipe. If you like soup, you should check out my recipes for butternut squash, curried parsnip and red pepper and tomato soups or if you would rather have something sweet, check out my recipe for lemon drizzle cake.

Have a good one and I’ll see you next week with a recipe for a delicious apple crumble.

H

 

Chicken Pie

Hands up if you have ever made puff pastry. Now keep them up if you have made it more than once. Chances are, 90% of the people who own up to making puff pastry have only made it once because let’s be realistic, nobody has time to make puff pastry at home unless they are trying to show off. It’s one of those things (like croissants) that you do to be able to say you have done it and never again.

The difficulty with puff pastry is how easy it is to go wrong. Patience is the key but even that only goes so far. The pastry must be kept cool – but not to cold otherwise the butter will seize and crack – and you must let it rest between every single fold. It takes a whole day. Some people call it a labour of love. I call it proving a point so when that one difficult person at your dinner party asks if you made the pastry yourself, because they have been watching too much Come Dine With Me, you can say that you did with a clear conscience.

Puff pastry is comprised of many incredibly thin layers of dough sandwiched with layers of butter or shortening. The fat stops the layers from adhering to each other so that when it goes into the oven, the steam created in the pastry can push the layers apart creating the flaky texture we all know and love. Of course, if your heart is set on making the pastry yourself, there are plenty of recipes out there but for most of us mere mortals, buying premade pastry is just fine.

The same process of lamination – creating the alternating layers of butter and dough – is performed when making croissants however unlike puff pastry, Danish pastry dough and croissant dough contain an extra leavening agent: yeast. This gives the dough a larger rise in the oven and results in a far softer finish. Puff pastry is hard and flaky but Danish pastries are soft and flaky. To be fair to the puff pastry, it’s still less time consuming than making croissants which, if you follow some recipes, will take days to prepare.

The recipe for my chicken pie is a relatively universal filling. For this one, I have given a basic pastry topped pie however the same filling can be used with a fully lined pie dish and I also use it for filling hot water crust pastry when I make giant chicken pies. It takes a little time to make but it keeps in the fridge so you can make it the day before and just pop on the pastry before it goes into the oven. The filling is delicious and is a good way to make a little chicken go a long way. When using hot water crust pastry, I can stretch the two chicken breasts to eight big portions

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Hot water crust pastry chicken pie

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Chicken Pie

Serves: 4

Prep time: 45 minutes (must be done in advance as the filling has to cool)

Cook time: 20 minutes

Price per portion: around £1.50

 

2 large onions (around 400g) – finely diced

2 large carrots (around 400g) – chopped into 1cm cubes

4 cloves garlic – minced or finely diced

2 chicken breasts – chopped into 2cm cubes

200ml strong chicken stock

200ml milk (can be replaced by water or 100ml milk and 100ml cream for an extra creamy filling)

¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

¼ cup cornflour mixed with ¼ cup of water

Salt and Pepper

Puff Pastry

 

Optional:

Egg wash

200g chorizo

 

 

For the filling:

If using chorizo, finely chop it and add to a pan with a teaspoon of oil (just enough to stop it sticking and burning).

Fry the chorizo for a few minutes to allow the fat to render out of it.

Remove the chorizo from the pan and set to one side. Keep the oil for frying the onions in.

If you are not using chorizo, add 2 tbsp oil to a large pan and add the onions. Fry until translucent.

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Add the carrot and the garlic and fry for another 5 minutes.

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Push the vegetables to the side of the pan and add the chicken into the well in the centre.

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Stir the chicken until it’s all sealed (white on the outside).

Add the stock and the milk and stir everything together.

Simmer for 10 minutes to soften the carrots.

Add the parsley and half the cornflour slurry stirring it through to thicken the sauce.

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If it is still very runny, add more slurry a tablespoon at a time until the sauce reaches your desired consistency. It should flow slowly as you want a gravy but you don’t want it to go everywhere when you cut into the pie!

Add salt and pepper to taste.

Simmer for another five minutes and then pour the filling into a pie dish and leave it to cool.

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Once the filling is cold, preheat the oven to gas mark 7 (2100C).

Roll out your puff pastry. Half a block/half a sheet should be enough to cover the entire pie if rolled out enough. (The rest of the puff pastry can be frozen or made into another pie or little snacks like cheese straws or palmier.)

Place the pie crust over the filling and tuck it down the sides so the pie bulges in the middle.

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If you want to do an egg wash, beat an egg with a tablespoon of water and then lightly brush the top of the pie. You can also use the egg wash to bind any off-cuts of pastry on as decorations.

Bake for 25 minutes turning about halfway through.

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Serve hot with potatoes and probably something green.

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Sometimes the green doesn’t make it but Hasselback potatoes always will!

 

I hope you enjoyed the recipe. If you fancy a beef pie instead, my recipe for a saucy cottage pie is divine and you can easily replace the mash with puff pastry as above or if you are looking for something a little bit sweeter, then check out how to make a delicious batch of scones!

Have a good one and I’ll see you next week with a recipe for a tangy lemon drizzle cake.

H

Fluffy Buttermilk Scones

There are many things that create conflict in this world. From politics to religion, people will always find something to argue about but one thing that is always guaranteed to get messy is: how do you prepare a scone. Cream then jam or jam then cream? This is not something that can be discussed in order to convince the other person you are correct, this is a matter of right and wrong. Despite following the Devonshire tradition of cream first, I appreciate that other people are welcome to follow the Cornish tradition of jam first. Of course, I also respect other people’s right to be incorrect but that is totally unrelated to this.

Scones are of course a particularly conflict inducing food because not only is there dispute about how to eat them, there is dispute about how to even pronounce their name. Is it scone or scone? The differences in pronunciation originate from both regional dialects and the old British class system. Scone as in gone tends to be more prevalent in northern England, Scotland and Ireland whereas scone as in cone is the normal pronunciation in both the south of England and the midlands.

Traditionally scones form the middle course of an afternoon tea; between the smoked salmon or cucumber sandwiches and the miniature cakes and pastries. They are bready and filling but not too sweet and are an easy way of getting the cream and jam to your mouth. Eaten around 4 o’clock afternoon tea emerged in the 1840s in the upper classes but by the end of the 19th century it was customary for the middle class to enjoy it too. Nowadays, going out for afternoon tea is a treat. That is of course, assuming you are not the Queen of England. She enjoys afternoon tea every day and is particularly partial to a slice of chocolate biscuit cake with it.

The recipes below are for plain, fruit and cheese scones but I wouldn’t advise using the last for an afternoon tea. When cutting the scone dough, it is important to use the sharpest cutter you can to avoid pinching the edges as this will prevent a vertical rise. You also want to work the dough as little as possible as overworked scones lose their fluffiness. Luckily, scones are very easy to make and of course, are absolutely delicious!

 

 

Scones

16 oz (450g) self raising flour (or 16 oz plain flour with 8 tsp baking powder)

4 oz (110g) butter

Pinch of salt

3 oz (85g) sugar

5.5 oz (150g) raisins with ½ tsp baking powder (optional)

284ml buttermilk (or 140ml yogurt with 140ml water)

Milk to glaze

 

Cheese Scones

16 oz (450g) self-raising flour (or 16 oz plain flour with 8 tsp baking powder)

4 oz (110g) butter

Pinch of salt

100g grated strong cheese + 25g to go on top

Pinch of cayenne pepper

½ tsp mustard

284ml buttermilk or 140ml yoghurt with 140ml water

 

 

Preheat the oven to gas mark 6 (2200C).

Rub the butter into the flour and stir through the salt.

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Plain (at the back), cheese (left) and fruit (right) scones all ready to be mixed into a dough.

Use a blunt knife to stir in the raisins/sugar/grated cheese and cayenne pepper.

Use the knife to stir in the buttermilk (and mustard if you are using it) until the mixture starts to come together.

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Once you cannot combine the dough anymore with the knife, pour it onto a surface and gently knead it together into a homogenous ball.

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Roll out the dough to ¾ inch  (2cm) thickness.

Cut out the dough into 3 inch circles and move onto baking parchment.

Use a pastry brush to brush a little milk onto the top of each scone. Make sure not to let it drip down the sides as this will stop the scones rising properly.

For plain and fruit scones, sprinkle a little caster sugar over them or for cheese scones, sprinkle the reserved grated cheese on top.

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Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes, turning after 10 minutes, or until the scones are all golden brown on top.

Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack.

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Serve plain and fruit scones with lashings of clotted cream and jam. Cheese scones go very well with a nice soup or piled high with grated cheese and chilli jam.

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Fruit scones with clotted cream and raspberry jam.
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Cheese scones with sliced cheddar and habanero pepper jam.

 

I hope you enjoyed the recipe. If you are considering making an afternoon tea, why not use a classic Victoria sandwich cake with it and maybe even make the sandwiches with some exciting artisan bread? Looking for a hearty dinner? treat yourself to a fantastic cottage pie. It serves four so you get leftovers too.

Have a good one and I’ll be back next week with a great filling for a chicken pie.

H